Filters applied:
Did You Mean? ?
one result

 

  • Book
    Guido Gainotti.
    Digital : Springer2020
    Intro -- Contents -- 1: Introduction -- References -- 2: What Are Emotions -- 2.1 Attempts to Define the Word 'Emotions' by Stressing Their Adaptive Value -- 2.2 Similarities and Differences Between the Emotional and the Cognitive System -- 2.3 The Hierarchical Structure of Human Emotions -- References -- 3: Brain Structures Playing a Critical Role in Different Components and Hierarchical Levels of Emotions -- 3.1 Brain Structures That Underlie the Main Components of Emotions -- 3.1.1 Brain Structures That Subsume the Evaluation of Emotional Significance 3.1.2 The Contribution of the Anterior Insula to the Conscious Experience of Emotion -- 3.1.3 Brain Structures That Contribute to the Generation of Emotional Responses -- 3.1.3.1 Brain Structures Involved in the Vegetative Components of the Emotional Response -- 3.1.3.2 Brain Structures Involved Generating the Expressive-Motor Components of the Emotional Response -- 3.2 Brain Structures Involved in the Highest Levels of Emotions and in the Control of Socially Unacceptable Emotional Responses 3.3 More Complex Neurobiological Models of the Interactions Between Different Brain Structures Involved in Emotional Functions -- References -- 4: The History of Research on Emotional Laterality -- 4.1 The Pioneers -- 4.2 First Interpretations of the Different Emotional Behaviour Shown by Right and Left Brain-Damaged Patients -- 4.3 Experimental and Clinical Investigations That Have Studied the Nonverbal Communicative Aspects of Emotions -- 4.3.1 Investigations That Have Studied Comprehension and Expression of Emotions in Normal Subjects 4.3.2 Investigations That Studied the Communicative Aspects of Emotions in Right and Left Brain-Damaged Patients -- 4.3.3 Models of Emotional Laterality Prompted by Studies of the Nonverbal Communicative Aspects of Emotions -- 4.3.3.1 The Hypothesis of a Right Hemisphere Dominance for Nonverbal Communication -- 4.3.3.2 The Hypothesis That Hemispheric Asymmetries May Concern Two Hierarchical Levels, Rather than Two Opposite Dimensions of Emotions 4.3.3.3 The Hypothesis Which Assumes That Frontal Lobe Asymmetries Are More Related to the Motivational System Engaged by the Stimulus than to Its Emotional Valence -- 4.4 Experimental and Clinical Investigations That Studied Laterality of the Autonomic Components of Emotions -- 4.4.1 Psychophysiological Correlates of Emotional Activation in Unilateral Brain-Damaged Patients -- 4.4.2 Hemispheric Asymmetries for Autonomic Heart Control -- 4.4.3 Psychophysiological Correlates of the Selective Emotional Stimulation of the Right and Left Hemispheres in Normal Subjects