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  • Book
    Digital2015
    Urban and rural children differ in their demographic characteristics, which in turn can affect their health status and health risks. The NSCH found that children in rural areas were more likely to be poor than those in urban areas. Of those who lived in small rural areas, 26.2 percent lived in households with incomes below the Federal Poverty Level (FPL), as did 26.6 percent of children in large rural areas. Of children living in urban areas, 21.5 percent had household incomes below the FPL. Rural children were also more likely to be non-Hispanic White than urban children. Among children in urban areas, approximately half (49.5 percent) were non-Hispanic White, compared to 65.5 percent of those in large rural areas and 69.0 percent of those in small rural areas. Overall, the survey found more similarities than differences with regard to the health status of children in urban and rural areas.