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Dr. Lloyd Minor - Research, Publications and Training

Dr. Lloyd B. Minor, MD, Dean of the Stanford University School of Medicine, Professor of Otolaryngology (Head and Neck Surgery)

Lloyd B. Minor, MD

Dean of Stanford University
School of Medicine,
Professor of Otolaryngology
(Head and Neck Surgery),
Professor of Bioengineering and
of Neurobiology, by courtesy

Community Academic Profile

Complexity as a Driver of Innovation and Discovery: Lessons Learned from the Vestibular System

Lloyd B. Minor, MD
Otolaryngology Grand Rounds, Oct. 18, 2012

Medical Research and Publications

Dr. Minor is an expert in balance and inner-ear disorders; he has published over 140 articles and chapters and founded a lab focused on vestibular research.

Dr. Minor is perhaps best known for his discovery of superior canal dehiscence syndrome (SCDS), a debilitating disorder characterized by sound- or pressure-induced dizziness. In 1998 Minor and colleagues published a description of the clinical manifestations of the syndrome and related its cause to an opening (dehiscence) in the bone covering the superior canal. He subsequently developed a surgical procedure that corrects the problem and alleviates symptoms.

In recognition of his work in refining a treatment for Méniêre's disease, another balance disorder, Minor received the Prosper Méniêre Society's gold medal in 2010.

A good overview of SCDS, Prosper Méniêre's disease and other advances by Dr. Minor.

Dr. Minor's Papers Published on Superior Canal Dehiscence Syndrome

Dr. Minor's Papers Published on Méniêre's Disease

Other Significant, Highly Cited Papers by Dr. Minor *

* Bolded titles on this page are papers that Dr. Minor considers his most significant. Other papers listed in this section have been cited by 25 or more subsequent research papers; several have been cited by more than 100 other papers.

Education, Training and Appointments

  • 2012 — Dean, Stanford University School of Medicine
  • 2009 — Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, The Johns Hopkins University; University Distinguished Service Professor, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
  • 2003 — Andelot Professor and Director (chair), Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; Otolaryngologist-in-Chief; The Johns Hopkins Hospital
  • 2002 — John E. Bordley Professor, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
  • 2001 — Professor, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery and Department of Neuroscience and of Biomedical Engineering (secondary appointments), Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
  • 1997 — Associate Professor, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery and Department of Neuroscience and of Biomedical Engineering (secondary appointments), Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
  • 1995 — Assistant Professor, Department of Biomedical Engineering (secondary appointment), Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
  • 1993 — Assistant Professor, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery and Department of Neuroscience (secondary appointment), Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
  • 1992 — Clinical Fellow, The Otology Group and The EAR Foundation in Nashville, TN (Otology and Neurootology)
  • 1988 — Resident, Division of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Chicago Medical Center
  • 1984 — Research Fellow, Department of Pharmacological and Physiological Sciences (Vestibular Neurophysiology), University of Chicago
  • 1982 — Resident, Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center
  • 1982 — M.D., Brown University
  • 1979 — Sc.B., Brown University
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