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World HealthAccess restricted to Stanford unless otherwise noted

  • Print Material
  • Community-associated methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus / Miller, L.G. -- Infections with organisms producing extended-spectrum [beta]-lactamase / Paterson, D.L., Doi, Y. -- Fluoroquinolone resistance : challenges for disease control / Parry, C.M. -- Antibiotic resistance and community-acquired pneumonia during an influenza pandemic / Moore, M.R., Whitney, C.G. -- Promoting appropriate antimicrobial drug use in the outpatient setting : what works? / Belongia, E.A., Mangione-Smith, R., Knobloch, M.J. -- Reducing antimicrobial-resistant infections in health care settings : what works? / Rezai, K., Weinstein, R.A. -- Cost of antimicrobial resistance in healthcare settings : a critical review / Merz, L.R., Guth, R.M., Fraser, V.J. -- Mass treatment of parasitic disease : implications for the development and spread of anthelmintic resistance / Curcher, T.S. ... [et al.] -- Antifungal drug resistance : clinical importance, in vitro detection and implications for prophylaxis and treatment / Arthington-Skaggs, B.A., Frade, J.P. -- Preparing for HIV drug resistance in the developing world / Bennett, D.E.
  • General issues in antimicrobial resistance -- Global perspectives of antibiotic resistance -- Mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance -- Poverty and root causes of resistance in developing countries -- What the future holds for resistance in developing countries -- Introduction of antimicrobial agents in resource-constrained countries: impact on the emergence of resistance -- Human impact of resistance -- Human immunodeficiency virus: resistance to antiretroviral drugs in developing countries -- Drug resistance in malaria in developing countries -- Drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis -- Antifungal drug resistance in developing countries -- Drug resistance in African trypanosomiasis -- Antimicrobial resistance in enteric pathogens in developing countries -- Bacterial-resistant infections in resource-limited countries -- Prevalence of resistant enterococci in developing countries -- Antimicrobial resistance in gram-negative bacteria from developing countries -- Resistance in reservoirs and human commensals -- Antimicrobial use and misuse -- Determinants of antimicrobial use: poorly understood-poorly researched -- Antimicrobial use and resistance in Africa -- Antimicrobial drug resistance in Asia -- Antimicrobial drug resistance in Latin American and the Caribbean -- Hospital infections by antimicrobial-resistant organisms in developing countries -- Cost, policy, and regulation of antimicrobials -- Economic burden of antimicrobial resistance in the developing world -- Strengthening health systems to improve access to antimicrobials and the containment of resistance -- Role of unregulated sale and dispensing of antimicrobial agents on the development of antimicrobial resistance in developing countries -- Counterfeit and substandard anti-infectives in developing countries -- Strategies to contain antimicrobial resistance -- Containment of antimicrobial resistance in developing countries and lessons learned -- Surveillance of antibiotic resistance in developing countries: needs, constraints and realities -- Vaccines: a cost-effective strategy to contain antimicrobial resistance -- Teaching appropriate antibiotic use in developing countries -- Containing global antibiotic resistance: ethical drug promotion in the developing world -- News media reporting of antimicrobial resistance in Latin America and India.
  • In the increasingly globalized twenty-first century, cross-cultural communication and knowledge of culturally informed health practices are critical skills for women's health providers. Around the Globe for Women's Health is a concise, culturally sensitive, and clinically relevant guide that aims to increase health equity through prevention and improved clinical care for women around the world. Case-based chapters highlight clinical issues (such as obstetric fistula, malaria, and postpartum hemorrhage) and barriers to care (the unmet need for family planning, or limited radiotherapy in low-resource countries, for example). Around the Globe for Women's Health is a must-have resource not just for physicians considering working in another country, but all providers seeking to provide better care for diverse populations of women within the United States.
  • Introduction. Headache disorders -- Epidemiology and burden -- Barriers to care -- Purpose of the atlas of headache disorders -- Methods. Questionnaire development -- Identification of respondents -- Data collection -- Data management and analysis -- Results. Data quality. Representativeness -- Limitations -- Data organization and presentation -- Themes. Epidemiology -- Impact on society, and national data -- Health-care utilization -- Diagnosis and assessment -- Treatment -- Professional training -- National professional organizations -- Issues -- The way forward.
  • This book captures the lessons learned from a variety of sectors: multi-sector planning, civil-military coordination, global health, communications, community, animal health, logistics, private sector, and travel and tourist--synthesizing key themes and lessons learned. Based on literature reviews conducted by technical specialists, each chapter identifies the most salient characteristics and lessons learned. Not surprisingly, many cross-cutting themes and lessons learned related to pandemic preparedness emerged.
  • Smallpox : eradicating an ancient scourge -- Oral rehydration salts : a miracle cure -- Mental health : unlocking the asylum doors -- The tobacco trap : fighting back -- AIDS : fear, stigma, and hope -- Tuberculosis : complacency kills -- Outbreak : the world's emergency room.
  • This book addresses whether or not calcium and magnesium ('hardness') in drinking water can contribute to preventing disease. It includes a comprehensive consensus view on what is known and what is not about the role and possible health benefit of calcium and magnesium in drinking-water. Also included is a series of chapters each authored by internationally renowned experts reviewing the state of the art in different aspects, including: global dietary calcium and magnesium intakes; the contribution of drinking water to calcium and magnesium intake; health significance of calcium and magnesium; role of drinking-water in relation to bone metabolism; epidemiological studies and the association of cardiovascular disease risks with water hardness and magnesium in particular; water production, technical issues and economics.--Publisher's description.
  • pt. 1. The study of disasters -- pt. 2. Causes of disasters -- pt. 3. Behavioral consequences of disasters -- pt. 4. Our models : applying a public health perspective.
  • The fundamentals : human rights and health -- Humanitarian medicine -- International, UN and WHO cooperation -- Disasters and conflicts -- Science, research and perspectives -- Society, health and equity.
  • This book addresses the impacts of current and future reproductive technologies on our world food production and provides a significant contribution to the importance of research in the area of reproductive physiology that has never been compiled before. It would provide a unique opportunity to separate the impacts of how reproductive technologies have affected different species and their contributions to food production. Lastly, no publication has been compiled that demonstrates the relationship between developments in reproductive management tools and food production that may be used a reference for scientists in addressing future research areas. During the past 50 years assisted reproductive technologies have been developed and refined to increase the number and quality of offspring from genetically superior farm animal livestock species. Artificial insemination (AI), estrous synchronization and fixed-time AI, semen and embryo cryopreservation, multiple ovulation and embryo transfer (MOET), in vitro fertilization, sex determination of sperm or embryos, and nuclear transfer are technologies that are used to enhance the production efficiency of livestock species.
  • Part A. Report of WHO expert consultation on DDT rish characterization -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Consensus statement -- Part B. Hazard and exposure assessments -- 1. Summary and conclusions -- 2. Chemical identity -- 3. Exposure sources and metrics -- 4. Kinetics and metabolism -- 5. Hepatic effects and enzyme induction -- 6. Neurotoxicity -- 7. Immunotoxicity -- 8. Carcinogenicity -- 9. Genotoxicity -- 10. Endocrinological and reproductive effects -- 11. Hazard characterization -- 12. Exposure assessment.
  • Chapter 1. Identifying general requirements -- Chapter 2. Identifying detailed requirements -- Chapter 3. Selecting a solution -- Chapter 4. Implementing an electronic recording and reporting system .
  • Global effects and prevention of emerging and epidemic pathogens: cholera and citrus greening as examples -- Surveillance -- Epidemiological surveillance of highly pathogenic diseases in Kazakhstan -- Surveillance on plague in Natural foci in Georgia -- Application of modern techniques for studying bacterial pathogens in Georgia -- Especially dangerous infections in Azerbaijan -- Strengthening the early-warning function of the surveillance system: the Macedonian experience -- Integrating geographic information systems and ecological niche modeling into disease ecology: a case study of Bacillus anthracis in the United States and Mexico -- Molecular analysis and tools -- Applications of paleomicrobiology to the understanding of emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases -- Characterization of a putative hemagglutinin gene in the caprine model for brucellosis -- Pathoadaptation of especially dangerous pathogens -- Detection of pathogens via high-throughput sequencing -- Environmental infuences on the relative stability of baculoviruses and Vaccinia virus: a review.
  • Emerging societies 2009, Karger
    Global changes in diet and activity patterns as drivers of the nutrition transition / Popkin, B.M. -- Regional case studies : India / Reddy, K.S. -- Regional case studies : China / Yin, S. -- Regional case studies : Africa / Prentice, A.M. -- Obesity in emerging nations : evolutionary origins and the impact of a rapid nutrition transition / Prentice, A.M. -- Prenatal origins of undernutrition / Christian, P. -- Postnatal origins of undernutrition / Prost, M.-A. -- Malnutrition, long-term health, and the effect of nutritional recovery / Sawaya, A.L. ... [et al.] -- The role of epigenetics in mediating environmental effects on phenotype / Morgan, D.; Whitelaw, E. -- Metabolism of methionine in vivo : impact of pregnancy, protein restriction, and fatty liver disease / Kalhan, S.C. -- Adiposity and comorbidities : favorable impact of caloric restriction / Ravussin, E.; Redman, L.M. -- Obesity, inflammation, and macrophages / Subramanian, V.; Ferrante, A.W., Jr. -- Obesity, hepatic metabolism and disease / Edmison, J.M.; Kalhan, S.C.; McCullough, A.J. -- Imperative of preventive measures addressing the life-cycle / Yajnik, C.S. -- New approaches to optimizing early diets / Polberger, S. -- Prevention of low birthweight / Alam, D.S. -- Community-based approaches to address childhood undernutrition and obesity in developing countries / Shetty, P.
  • Introduction to the guidelines. Purpose, target and scope -- Background -- A dual obligation, a quadruple imperative -- Indispensability of controlled medicines in contemporary medical practices -- Safety of controlled medicines -- Current availability -- Impediments to availability, accessibility and affordability -- Why and how to work with this document? -- Guidelines for ensuring balance in national policies on controlled substances. Content of drug control legislation and policy -- Authorities and their role in the system -- Policy planning for availability and accessibility -- Healthcare professionals -- Estimates and statistics -- Procurement -- Other -- Country assessment checklist.
  • Evidence for health 2013, Cambridge
    "Evidence for Health: From Patient Choice to Global Policy is a practical guide to evidence-informed decision-making. It provides health practitioners and policy-makers with a broad overview of how to improve health and reduce health inequities, as well as the tools needed to make informed decisions that will have a positive influence on health. Chapters address questions such as: What are the major threats to health? What are the causes of poor health? What works to improve health? How do we know that it works? What are the barriers to implementation? What are the measures of success? The book provides an algorithm for arriving at evidence-informed decisions that take into consideration the multiple contextual factors and value judgements involved. Written by a specialist in public health with a wealth of international experience, this user-friendly guide demystifies the decision-making process, from personal decisions made by individual patients to global policy decisions"--Provided by publisher.
  • Chapter 1. The evolving threat of antimicrobial resistance: Introduction -- Chapter 2. Surveillance to track antimicrobial use and resistance in bacteria -- Chapter 3. Measures to ensure better use of antibiotics -- Chapter 4. Reducing antimicrobial use in animal husbandry -- Chapter 5. Infection prevention and control in health-care facilities -- Chapter 6. Fostering innovation to combat antimicrobial resistance -- Chapter 7. The way forward: political commitment to enable options for action -- Appendix 1. List of 2001 WHO Global Strategy for Containment of Antimicrobial Resistance recommendations -- Appendix 2. List of 2011 WHO World Health Day six-point policy briefs.
  • Provides an overview of the neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) and how they devastate the poor, essentially trapping them in a vicious cycle of extreme poverty by preventing them from working or attaining their full intellectual and cognitive development.
  • "WHO's third decade was characterized by a sense of optimism, perhaps naive in retrospect. There was a feeling that progress was possible, not only in health, but in social and economic ways to improve individual and collective well-being. This optimism was reflected in the approval by the Thirtieth World Health Assembly in May 1977 of resolution WHA30.43, which stated that WHO's main social target for the coming decades should be for all citizens of the world to attain by the year 2000 a level of health to enable them to lead socially and economically productive lives."--Introduction, p. vii.
  • In the past decade the global financial assistance for AIDS responses increased tremendously and the donor community provided greater resources to community responses. Yet little is known about the global magnitude of these resources and their allocation among HIV and AIDS activities and services. To address this knowledge gap, this report pulls together evidence from several different sources (donor data bases, surveys of civil society organizations, country funding profiles) to determine, among other things, how funds are reaching civil society and community-based organizations, how these funds are being used, and the degree to which these organizations rely on other sources of funding.--Source other than Library of Congress.
  • The International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH) is a unique project that brings together the regulatory authorities of Europe, Japan and the US and experts from the pharmaceutical industry in the three regions to discuss scientific and technical aspects of product registration. In Japan, the members are the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW), and the Japan Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association (JPMA). In Europe, the members are the EU (Representatives of the European Commission and the European Medicines Agency [EMA]), and the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations (EFPIA). In the United States, the members are the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA). The International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Associations (IFPMA) is the secretariat of the ICH. Additional members include Observers from WHO, European Free Trade Association (EFTA), and Canada. The Observers represent non-ICH countries and regions. This volume considers one of ICH's major categories, Safety, covering topics relating to in vitro and in vivo pre-clinical studies (Carcinogenicity Testing, Genotoxicity Testing, etc.). Since the start of the ICH process, many guidelines have been written, but in most cases there is a lack of awareness of the many issues that were addressed during the development of the consensus guidances. Further, just as it is important to understand what the guidances state, it is also important to understand the thoughts, debates, and intent of the experts involved, which are not included in the guidance documents. Why has the guideline been written as it is written, why are some topics ignored, and why have some initial guidance proposals have been deleted. These and other related questions and answers are the contents of this book, written by experts who were directly involved in writing the ICH guidances that drive drug development today.
  • "This fourth volume of the Global Burden of Disease and Injuries Series provides the reader with information on the epidemiology and burden of major infectious and parasitic diseases. As with previous volumes of the Global Burden of Disease study, the chapters in this book detail the situation as experienced in the year 1990. Since then the epidemiology of some of the conditions described has changed, and where this is the case the authors have added a brief paragraph acknowledging this. The chapters therefore do not provide a detailed update on the current burden of disease, which is accommodated in the documentation of the Global Burden of Disease 2000 and published elsewhere."--Preface.
  • Section I. Theoretical and methodological issues -- High-risk versus population prevention strategies for NCDs: Geoffrey Rose revisited in the twenty-first century -- Current and future theoretical foundations for NCDs and health promotion -- The nature of causality: beyond traditional evidence -- Surveillance for NCDs and health promotion: an issue of theory and method -- Section II. Lenses for understanding NCDs -- Learning from the social sciences in chronic diseases health promotion: structure, agency and distributive justice -- Contextual factors in health and illness -- The social determinants of non-communicable diseases: a political perspective -- Risk factors: tobacco -- Physical inactivity and health promotion: evidence and challenges -- NGOs addressing NCDs through a health promotion lens -- Health literacy as a lens for understanding non-communicable diseases and health promotion -- From healthy public policy to intersectoral action and health-in-all policies -- Section III. Approaches to NCDs -- Population health intervention research: a fundamental science for NCD prevention -- Planning and management of cross-sectoral programs: strategies to address NCDs -- The public policy approach: governments, institutions, welfare states and social justice -- Accelerating action on NCDs: Understanding and applying a social determinants of health framework for changes -- Cardiovascular health, risk, and disease: primordial and remedial strategies -- Advocacy strategies to address NCDs: actions to increase the profile of physical activity -- Advocacy strategies to address NCDs: tobacco control -- Evidence synthesis to inform NCD prevention and health promotion -- Using evidence to inform NCD prevention and heal promotion -- The health promotion argument: NCDs and public health -- Public health, NDCs, health promotion, and business partnering: benefits, concerns, remedies, and moving towards creative partnering -- Section IV. Institutions and organizations -- Framing international trade and chronic disease -- Addressing NCDs through multilateral engagement at the United Nations: The role of WHO -- Governance, policy, and institutions -- NCDs and civil society: a history and a roadmap -- Developing health promotion workforce capacity for addressing non-communicable diseases globally -- Health promotion for NCDs in and by hospitals: a health promoting hospital perspective.
  • Global health diplomacy 2013, Springer
    The world's problems are indeed world problems: social and environmental crises, global trade and politics, and major epidemics are making public health a pressing global concern. From this constantly changing scenario, global health diplomacy has evolved, at the intersection of public health, international relations, law, economics, and management--a new discipline with transformative potential. Global Health Diplomacy situates this concept firmly within the human rights dialogue and provides a solid framework for understanding global health issues and their negotiation. This up-to-the-minute guide sets out defining principles and the current agenda of the field, and examines key relationships such as between trade and health diplomacy, and between global health and environmental issues. The processes of global governance are detailed as the UN, WHO, and other multinational actors work to address health inequalities among the world's peoples. And to ensure maximum usefulness, the text includes plentiful examples, discussion questions, reading lists, and a glossary. Featured topics include: The legal basis of global health agreements and negotiations.Global public goods as a foundation for global health diplomacy.Global health: a human security perspective.Health issues and foreign policy at the UN.National strategies for global health.South-south cooperation and other new models of development. A volume of immediate utility with a potent vision for the future, Global Health Diplomacy is an essential text for public health experts and diplomats as well as schools of public health and international affairs.
  • Global information warfare 2002, CRCnetBASE
  • Global perspectives on health promotion and effectiveness: an introduction / David V. McQueen and Catherine M. Jones -- The Global Programme on Health Promotion Effectiveness (GPHPE): a global process for assessing health promotion effectiveness with regional diversity / Catherine M. Jones ... [et al.] -- The IUHPE blueprint for direct and sustained dialogue in partnership initiatives / Catherine M. Jones and Maurice B. Mittelmark -- The Global Programme on Health Promotion Effectiveness: a case study of global partnership functioning / J. Hope Corbin and Maurice B. Mittelmark -- Policies for health: the effectiveness of their development, adoption, and implementation / Evelyne de Leeuw -- Strengthening the evidence base for mental health promotion / Margaret M. Barry ... [et al.] -- Effectiveness and challenges for promoting physical activity globally / Trevor Shilton ... [et al.] -- School health promotion: achievements, challenges, and priorities / Lawrence St. Leger ... [et al.] -- Health promotion to prevent obesity: evidence and policy needs / Tim Lobstein and Boyd Swinburn -- Effective health promotion against tobacco use / Karen Slama ... [et al.] -- Effectiveness of health promotion in preventing alcohol related harm / Peter Howat ... [et al.] --Globalization and health promotion: the evidence challenge / Ronald Labonte -- Urbanization and health promotion: challenges and opportunities / Andrea Neiman and Mary Hall -- Community interventions on social determinants of health: focusing the evidence / Marilyn Metzler ... [et al.] -- Strengthening peace-building through health promotion: development of a framework / Anne W. Bunde-Birouste and Jan E. Ritchie -- The role of governance in health promotion effectiveness / Marilyn Wise -- Evidence and theory: continuing debates on evidence and effectiveness / David V. McQueen -- Measurement and effectiveness: methodological considerations, issues, and possible solutions / Stefano Campostrini -- Healthy settings: building evidence for the effectiveness of whole system health promotion--challenges and future directions / Mark Dooris ... [et al.] -- Feasibility for health promotion under various decision-making contexts / Ligia de Salazar -- Evaluating equity in health promotion / Louise Potvin, Pascale Mantoura, and Valéry Ridde -- Evaluation of empowerment and effectiveness: universal concepts? / Valéry Ridde, Treena Delormier, and Ghislaine Goudreau -- Enhancing the effectiveness and quality of health promotion: perspectives of the International Union for Health Promotion and Education / Maurice B. Mittelmark ... [et al.] -- Annex: Global Programme on Health Promotion Effectiveness: description and list of partners.
  • The idea of social capital emerged in the social science disciplines to explain puzzling phenomena such as why some communities fare better in crisis than others. As the field matures, it has been adapted to wide-ranging issues such as population health. This book presents the major research issues as well as nuanced theoretical discussion in keeping with an evolving field in Europe, Asia, and the U.S. Background chapters analyze how social capital manifests in neighborhoods, workplaces, and schools, and its relationship to health. The second half offers guidelines for improving population health at the social capital level, and examples of interventions, such as microfinance programs, in which enhanced social capital and health benefits are a significant by-product. And a number of contributors debate the problems of defining the concept and using the term at all.
  • Navigating the GPIRM -- Acronyms and abbreviations -- Contributors -- Foreword -- Executive summary -- Part 1. The threat of insecticide resistance -- 1.1 Malaria vector control today -- 1.2 Status of insecticide resistance -- 1.3 Potential effect of resistance on the burden of malaria -- 1.4 Available strategies for managing resistance -- Part 2. Collective strategy against insecticide resistance -- 2.1 Overall malaria community strategy -- 2.2 Country activities -- 2.3 Research agenda -- 2.4 enabling mechanisms -- 2.5 Financial cost -- Part 3. Technical recommendations for countries -- 3.1 Geographical areas with unknown levels of resistance -- 3.2 Geographical areas in which indoor residual spraying is the main form of vector control -- 3.3 Geographical areas in which LLINs are the main form of vector control -- 3.4 Geographical areas in which LLINs and IRs are already used in combination -- 3.5 Choosing alternative insecticides -- Part 4. Near-term action plan -- 4.1 Role of each stakeholder group -- 4.2 Action plan -- References -- Annex 1 Past use of malaria vector control tools -- Annex 2 Long-lasting insecticidal nets, indoor residual spraying and other vector control interventions -- Annex 3 History of insecticide resistance in malaria vectors -- Annex 4 Challenges in measuring the impact of insecticide resistance on the effectiveness of vector control -- Annex 5 example of 'tipping-point' in resistant Aedes mosquitoes -- Annex 6 selection pressure: role of public health, agriculture and other factors -- Annex 7 Implications of discriminating doses of insecticide on detection of resistance -- Annex 8 Main hypotheses used to model the impact of insecticide resistance on malaria burden -- Annex 9 use of insecticide resistance management strategies (rotations, combinations, mosaics and mixtures) -- Annex 10 Genetic research agenda -- Annex 11 Financial modelling -- Annex 12 Definitions.
  • "This publication presents a comprehensive perspective on the worldwide, regional and country consumption of alcohol, patterns of drinking, health consequences and policy responses in member states. It represents a continuing effort by WHO to support member states with global information in their efforts to reduce the harmful use of alcohol and its health and social consequences"--Publisher's description.
  • The Global status report on alcohol and health 2014 presents a comprehensive perspective on the global, regional and country consumption of alcohol, patterns of drinking, health consequences and policy responses in Member States. It represents a continuing effort by the World Health Organization (WHO) to support Member States in collecting information in order to assist them in their efforts to reduce the harmful use of alcohol, and its health and social consequences. The report was launched in Geneva on Monday 12 May 2014 during the second meeting of the global network of WHO national counterparts for implementation of the global strategy to reduce the harmful use of alcohol.--Publisher's description.
  • "This report sets out the statistics, evidence and experiences needed to launch a more forceful response to the growing threat posed by noncommunicable diseases. While advice and recommendations are universally relevant, the report gives particular attention to conditions in low- and middle-income countries, which now bear nearly 80% of the burden from diseases like cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer and chronic respiratory diseases. The health consequences of the worldwide epidemic of obesity are also addressed. The report takes an analytical approach, using global, regional and country-specific data to document the magnitude of the problem, project future trends, and assess the factors contributing to these trends. As noted, the epidemic of these diseases is being driven by forces now touching every region of the world: demographic aging, rapid unplanned urbanization, and the globalization of unhealthy lifestyles"--Publisher's description.
  • "Over 1.2 million people die each year on the world' roads, and between 20 and 50 million suffer non-fatal injuries. In most regions of the world this epidemic of road traffic injuries is still increasing. In the past five years most countries have endorsed the recommendations of the World report on road traffic injury prevention which give guidance on how countries can implement a comprehensive approach to improving road safety and reducing the death toll on their roads. To date, however, there has been no global assessment of road safety that indicates the extent to which this approach is being implemented. This Global status report on road safety is the first broad assessment of the status of road safety in 178 countries, using data drawn from a standardized survey conducted in 2008. The results provide a benchmark that countries can use to assess their road safety position relative to other countries, while internationally the data presented can collectively be considered as a global "aseline"against which progress over time can be measured. " - p. [v11]
  • This report provides legislation data last updated in 2011 and fatality data updated for 2010.
  • ch. 1. Introduction -- ch. 2. The burden of disease caused by TB -- ch. 3. TB case notifications and treatment outcomes -- ch. 4. Drug-resistant TB -- ch. 5. Diagnostics and laboratory strengthening -- ch. 6. Addressing the co-epidemics of TB and HIV -- ch. 7. Financing -- ch. 8. Research and development.
  • Globalization and health 2006, Springer
  • 1. Introduction -- 2. A conceptual framework for implementing the Guidelines -- 3. Health-based targets -- 4. Water safety plans -- 5. Surveillance -- 6. Application of the Guidelines in specific circumstances -- 7. Microbial aspects -- 8. Chemical aspects -- 9. Radiological aspects -- 10. Acceptability aspects: Taste, odour and appearance -- 11. Microbial fact sheets -- 12. Chemical fact sheets.
  • Front Matter -- Introduction -- Perspectives on Communication and Global Health. Theoretical Divides and Convergence in Global Health Communication / Silvio Waisbord, Rafael Obregon -- New Perspectives on Global Health Communication / Collins O Airhihenbuwa, Mohan J Dutta -- Rethinking Health Communication in Aid and Development / Elizabeth Fox -- Toward a Global Theory of Health Behavior and Social Change / Douglas Storey, maria elena Figueroa -- Theoretical Perspectives on and Approaches to Health Communication in a Global Context. The Impact of Health Communication Programs / Jane T Bertrand, Stella Babalola, Joanna Skinner -- Promoting Health through Entertainment-Education Media / William J Brown -- Interpersonal Health Communication / Rukhsana Ahmed -- Community Health and Social Mobilization / Catherine Campbell, Kerry Scott -- Health, News, and Media Information / Jesus Arroyave -- Using Complexity-Informed Communication Strategies to Address Complex Health Issues / Virginia Lacayo -- Community Media, Health Communication, and Engagement / Linje Manyozo -- Global E-health Communication / L Suzanne Suggs, Scott C Ratzan -- Managing Fear to Promote Healthy Change / Merissa Ferrara, Anthony J Roberto, Kim Witte -- Innovations in the Evaluation of Social Change Communication for HIV and AIDS / Ailish Byrne, Robin Vincent -- Case Studies of Applied Theory and Innovation. Mobile Phones / Katherine de Tolly, Peter Benjamin -- Social Marketing and Condom Promotion in Madagascar / W Douglas Evans, Kim Longfield, Navendu Shekhar, Andry Rabemanatsoa, Ietje Reerink, Jeremy Snider -- Participatory Health Communication Research / Karen Greiner -- Egypt's Initiative / Ron Hess, Dominique Meekers, J Douglas Storey -- Risk Communication and Emerging Infectious Diseases / Ketan Chitnis -- Journalism and HIV / gregory Alonso Pirio -- jovenHABLAjoven / jair vega Casanova, carmen R Mendivil Calder̤n -- Changing Gender Norms for HIV and Violence Risk Reduction / Julie Pulerwitz, Gary Barker, Ravi Verma -- Women's Health and Healing in the Peruvian Amazon / Ami Sengupta, Eliana Elias -- Positive Deviance, Good for Global Health / Arvind Singhal, Luc̕a Dur̀ -- Health Promotion from the Grassroots / mar̕a Beatriz Torres -- ₃Children can't wait₄ / Shereen Usdin, Nicola Christofides -- Crosscutting Issues. Capacity Building (and Strengthening) in Health Communication / Rafael Obregon, Silvio Waisbord -- Institutionalizing Communication in International Health / Jose Rimon, Suruchi Sood -- Communication and Public Health in a Glocalized Context / Thomas Tufte -- Conclusions: Rethinking the Field. Toward Social Justice in Directed Social Change / Srinivas R Melkote -- Conclusions / Silvio Waisbord, Rafael Obregon -- Index.
  • Healers abroad 2005, NAP
    Workforce and global health -- Confronting HIV/AIDS on the ground -- New routes of engagement against global HIV/AIDS -- Envisioning a U.S. Global Health Service -- Programs of the U.S. Global Health Service -- Forward planning.
  • Revitalising the public health evidence base: an asset model -- A salutogenic approach to tackling health inequalities -- A theoretical model of assets: the link -- Asset mapping in communities -- Assets based interventions: evaluating and synthesizing evidence of the effectiveness of the assets based approach to health promotion -- Resilience as an asset for healthy development -- How to assess resilience: reflections on a measurement model -- Measuring children's well-being: some problems and possibilities -- The relationship between health assets, social capital and cohesive communities -- Community empowerment and health improvement: the English experience -- Strengthening the assets of women living in disadvantaged situations: the German experience -- Sustainable community-based health and development programs in rural India -- The application and evaluation of an assets-based model in Latin America and the Caribbean: the experience with the healthy settings approach -- Parents and communities' assets to control under-five child malaria in rural Benin, West Africa -- Strengthening asset focused policy making in Hungary -- How forms in social capital can be an asset for promoting health equity -- Internal and external assets and Romanian adolescents' health: an evidence-based approach to health promoting schools policy -- Bringing it all together: the salutogenic response to some of the most pertinent public health dilemmas.
  • 1. Overview of housing and climate/environment linkages -- 2. Review of housing and health risks -- 3. Evaluating health co-benefits and risks of IPCC-reviewed mitigation strategies -- 4. Gap analysis: optimizing health benefits and correcting risks of mitigation strategies -- 5. Tools to assess, plan and finance healthy and climate-friendly housing -- 6. Case studies of good practice -- 7. Conclusions and recommendations.
  • Healthcare Overview 2012, Springer
    pt. I. Healthcare Systems Around the Globe -- pt. II. Female Health/Care -- pt. III. Traditional and Non-Conventional Medicine -- pt. IV. The Role of Laboratory Medicine in Healthcare -- pt. V. Economy of PPPM -- pt. VI. Ethics of PPPM.
  • Hidden cities 2010, WHO
    "The joint WHO and UN-HABITAT report, Hidden cities: unmasking and overcoming health inequities in urban settings, is being released at a turning point in human history. For the first time ever, the majority of the world's population is living in cities, and this proportion continues to grow ... The number of urban residents is growing by nearly 60 million every year. This demographic transition from rural to urban, or urbanization, has far-reaching consequences ... " - p. ix
  • Part 1. Transmission of HIV-1 infection to the infant through breastfeeding -- Breastfeeding and Transmission of HIV-1: Epidemiology and Global Magnitude / Mary Glenn Fowler, Athena P. Kourtis, Jim Aizire, Carolyne Onyango-Makumbi and Marc Bulterys -- Breastfeeding and Transmission of Viruses Other than HIV-1 / Claire L. Townsend, Catherine S. Peckham and Claire Thorne -- Breastfeeding Among HIV-1 Infected Women: Maternal Health Outcomes and Social Repercussions / Elizabeth Stringer and Kate Shearer -- Early Diagnosis of HIV Infection in the Breastfed Infant / Chin-Yih Ou, Susan Fiscus, Dennis Ellenberger, Bharat Parekh and Christine Korhonen, et al. -- Part 2. Mechanisms of HIV-1 transmission through breast milk: Virology -- Virologic Determinants of Breast Milk Transmission of HIV-1 / Susan A. Fiscus and Grace M. Aldrovandi -- HIV-1 Resistance to Antiretroviral Agents: Relevance to Mothers and Infants in the Breastfeeding Setting / Michelle S. McConnell and Paul Palumbo -- Animal Models of HIV Transmission Through Breastfeeding and Pediatric HIV Infection / Koen K. A. Van Rompay and Kartika Jayashankar -- Antiretroviral Pharmacology in Breast Milk / Amanda H. Corbett -- Part 3. Mechanisms of HIV-1 transmission through breast milk: Immunology -- The Immune System of Breast Milk: Antimicrobial and Anti-inflammatory Properties / Philippe Lepage and Philippe Van de Perre -- B Lymphocyte-Derived Humoral Immune Defenses in Breast Milk Transmission of the HIV-1 / Laurent Bélec and Athena P. Kourtis -- Cellular Immunity in Breast Milk: Implications for Postnatal Transmission of HIV-1 to the Infant / Steffanie Sabbaj, Chris C. Ibegbu and Athena P. Kourtis -- Part 4. Prevention of breast milk transmission of HIV-1 --Antiretroviral Drugs During Breastfeeding for the Prevention of Postnatal Transmission of HIV-1 / Athena P. Kourtis, Isabelle de Vincenzi, Denise J. Jamieson and Marc Bulterys -- Immune Approaches for the Prevention of Breast Milk Transmission of HIV-1 / Barbara Lohman-Payne, Jennifer Slyker and Sarah L. Rowland-Jones -- Non-antiretroviral Approaches to Prevention of Breast Milk Transmission of HIV-1: Exclusive Breastfeeding, Early Weaning, Treatment of Expressed Breast Milk / Jennifer S. Read -- Breast Milk Micronutrients and Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV-1 / Monal R. Shroff and Eduardo Villamor -- Part 5. Research Implementation and Policy Related to Breastfeeding by HIV-1-Infected Mothers -- Historical Perspective of African-Based Research on HIV-1 Transmission Through Breastfeeding: The Malawi Experience / Taha E. Taha -- Breastfeeding and HIV Infection in China / Christine Korhonen, Liming Wang, Linhong Wang, Serena Fuller and Fang Wang, et al. -- The Role of the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief in Infant and Young Child Feeding Guideline Development and Program Implementation / Michelle R. Adler, Margaret Brewinski, Amie N. Heap and Omotayo Bolu -- HIV-1 and Breastfeeding in the United States / Kristen M. Little, Dale J. Hu and Ken L. Dominguez -- Part 6. DEBATE: Should Women With HIV-1 Infection Breastfeed Their Infants? Balancing the Scientific Evidence, Ethical Issues and Cost-Policy Considerations -- Pendulum Swings in HIV-1 and Infant Feeding Policies: Now Halfway Back / Louise Kuhn and Grace Aldrovandi -- Should Women with HIV-1 Infection Breastfeed Their Infants? It Depends on the Setting / Grace John-Stewart and Ruth Nduati -- Part 7. The Epilogue -- The Future of Breastfeeding in the Face of HIV-1 Infection: Science and Policy / Marc Bulterys and Athena P. Kourtis.
  • Module 1. Target diseases -- Module 2. The vaccines -- Module 3. The cold chain -- Module 4. Ensuring safe injections -- Module 5. Planning immunization sessions to reach every infant -- Module 6. Holding an immunization session -- Module 7. Monitoring and using your data -- Module 8. Building community support for immunization.
  • "Half the world's people currently live in rural and remote areas. The problem is that most health workers live and work in cities. This imbalance is common to almost all countries and poses a major challenge to the nationwide provision of health services. Its impact, however, is most severe in low income countries. ... The World Health Organization (WHO) has therefore drawn up a comprehensive set of strategies to help countries encourage health workers to live and work in remote and rural areas. These include refining the ways students are selected and educated, as well as creating better working and living conditions. ... The guidelines ... complement the WHO Global Code of Practice on the International Recruitment of Health Personnel, adopted by the Sixty-third World Health Assembly in May 2010. The Code offers a framework to manage international migration over the medium to longer term. The guidelines are a tool that can be used straight away to address one of the first triggers to internal and international migration - dissatisfaction with living and working conditions in rural areas. Together, the code of practice and these new guidelines provide countries with instruments to improve workforce distribution and enhance health services." - p. i
  • Infant feeding practices 2011, Springer
  • PART 1: Primary care for mental health in context -- Chapter 1. Primary care for mental health within a pyramid of health care -- Chapter 2. Seven good reasons for integrating mental health into primary care -- -- PART 2: Primary care for mental health in practice -- Introduction -- Argentina: Physician-led primary care for mental health in Neuquén province, Patagonia region -- Australia: Integrated mental health care for older people in general practices of inner-city Sydney -- Brazil: Integrated primary care for mental health in the city of Sobral -- Chile: Integrated primary care for mental health in the Macul district of Santiago -- India: Integrated primary care for mental health in the Thiruvananthapuram District, Kerala State -- Islamic Republic of Iran: Nationwide integration of mental health into primary care -- Saudi Arabia: Integrated primary care for mental health in the Eastern Province -- South Africa: Integrated primary care services and a partnership for mental health primary care -- Ehlanzeni District, Mpumalanga Province, and Moorreesburg District, Western Cape Province -- Uganda: Integrated primary care for mental health in the Sembabule District -- United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland: Primary care for mental health for disadvantaged communities in London -- -- Report conclusions -- -- Annex 1: Improving the practice of primary care for mental health
  • The use of structured frameworks in chemical risk assessment promotes transparent, harmonized approaches. This publication presents two IPCS frameworks originally published in Critical Reviews in Toxicology. Part 1 contains the IPCS Framework for Analyzing the Relevance of a Cancer Mode of Action for Humans, along with three case studies illustrating its application. Part 2 contains the IPCS Framework for Analyzing the Relevance of a Non-Cancer Mode of Action for Humans. The frameworks provide a means of ensuring a transparent evaluation of the data, identification of key data gaps and of information that would be of value in the further risk assessment of the chemical in question.--Publisher's description.
  • pt.1. IPCS/OECD key generic terms used in chemical hazard/risk assessment -- pt.2. IPCS glossary of key exposure assessment terminology
  • "WHO has developed this manual in order to strengthen the laboratory diagnosis and virological surveillance of influenza infection by providing standard methods for the collection, detection, isolation and characterization of viruses"--Publisher's description.
  • TheMassGeneral Hospital for Children Handbook of Pediatric Global Health is a concise resource for the ever-increasing number of health professionals involved in global health, many of whom spend a few weeks to months or even years providing medical care in resource-poor countries. This Handbook provides practical, evidence-based, hands-on guidance for managing and preventing childhood illnesses when resources are limited in low- and middle-income countries. It also offers a setting-specific understanding and management approaches to the major causes of childhood mortality, including pneumonia, diarrhea, birth asphyxia, complications of preterm birth, and neonatal sepsis. The Handbook providesan overview of childhood mortality, health systems, and the various stakeholders that play a role in the global health arena, and also contains chapters focusing on adolescents who are increasingly recognized as a unique population in whom interventions can go a long way in bothconsolidatingthe gains made in childhood and preventing adult disease. Finally, key topics in non-communicable diseases are covered, including trauma and injuries, pediatric mental health, child and adolescent rights, and oral health. Not meant solely for pediatricians, the Handbookis designed for generalists, specialists, doctors, nurses, other health care workers, and those in training. An indispensable reference for health professionals overseas, theHandbookwill also be a useful addition and resource for academic centers and universities in industrialized nations that are creating courses for trainees who will do clinical electives abroad during their training. .
  • A history of international cooperation in maternal and child health -- Global burden of disease among women, children, and adolescents -- Promotion of global perinatal health -- Maternal and child health in the organization for economic cooperation and development (OECD) countries -- Health system impacts on maternal and child health -- The environment and maternal child health -- Impact of wars and conflict on maternal and child health -- The impact of globalization on maternal and child health -- Gender equity: perspectives on maternal and child health -- Harmful traditional practices and women's health: female genital mutilation -- Abortion and postabortion care -- Malaria in women and children -- The global burden of childhood diarrhea -- Tuberculosis in childhood and pregnancy -- Impact of HIV on the health of women, children, and families in less developed countries -- Malnutrition and maternal and child health -- The global burden of obstetric fistulas -- Health challenges for women, children, and adolescents with disabilities -- Unintentional injuries in children -- Evidence-based maternal and child health -- A global perspective on teen pregnancy -- Progress and challenges in making pregnancy safer: a global perspective -- Global immunization challenge: progress and opportunities -- Adolescent health -- The global burden of child maltreatment -- Children in difficult circumstances -- Integrated management of childhood illness -- Planning, development, and maintenance of the MCH workforce -- An agenda for child health policy in developing countries.
  • People with mental health conditions comprise a vulnerable group -- Other vulnerable groups have high rates of mental health conditions -- Improving development outcomes: principles and actions -- All development stakeholders have important roles to play -- Conclusion.
  • "The World Health Organization launched Project Atlas in 2000. The objective of this project is to collect, compile and disseminate relevant information on mental health resources in countries. The first set of publications from the project appeared in October 2001; these were updated in 2005. These publications have already established themselves as the most authoritative source of such information globally. Responding to the continued need for accurate information, WHO has fully revised and updated the Atlas" -- Page 5.
  • The second volume on One Health explains in detail how to implement three key aspects of the One Health paradigm food safety and security, national plans for a holistic one health approach, and relevant new technologies and approaches. The fourteen chapters, each by an internationally recognized authority, are organized into three sections of four or five chapters each, that break new ground in clarifying precisely how One Health can become an operational reality in local, national and international public health initiatives. Section three begins with an international overview on food safety and security. The importance of a One Heath approach is then explained in relation to four specific problems?the growing prevalence of antibiotic resistance, bovine spongiform encephalopathy and pathogenic E.coli. Section four begins with the role of the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) in promoting One Health. The formulation and implementation of national plans for implementing the One Health paradigm are then set out for Africa, the Western Pacific, Southeast Asia and Mongolia. The final section of this two volume book is devoted to implementing new technologies and new approaches to One Health. A wide-ranging analysis considers the importance of climate change and a social-ecological systems approach, as well as how to operationalize One Health, how to move from emergency response to prevention at source, and how to implement an educational strategy that builds a foundation for One Health in emerging disease management. It is anticipated that this two volume book will become a benchmark for practitioners of One Health, empowering a balanced multidisciplinary approach to the complexities of the human-animal-environment interface.
  • One Health: its origins and future -- One Health and emerging infectious diseases: clinical perspectives -- The historical, present, and future role of veterinarians in One Health -- The importance of understanding the human-animal interface -- The human environment interface: applying ecosystem concepts to health -- Wildlife: the need to better understand the linkages -- The economic value of One Health in relation to the mitigation of zoonotic disease risks -- The application of One Health approaches to henipavirus research -- H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza in Indonesia: retrospective considerations -- Rabies in Asia: the classical zoonosis -- Japanese encephalitis: on the One Health agenda -- Cost estimate of bovine tuberculosis to Ethiopia -- The pandemic H1N1 influenza experience -- One Health: the Hong Kong experience with avian influenza -- Clostridium difficile infection in humans and piglets: a 'One Health' opportunity -- Men, primates, and germs: an ongoing affair -- Erratum to: Cost estimate of bovine tuberculosis to Ethopia -- Index.
  • Influenza pandemics are unpredictable but recurring events that can have severe consequences on societies worldwide. This revised WHO guidance publication on pandemic influenza preparedness and response acknowledges that pandemic preparedness is centered around health sectors planning but must also be broader. WHO therefore advocates a "whole-of-society" approach to sustainable and ethical pandemic preparedness while focusing in more detail on the role of the health sector. The roles of WHO and national governments are outlined to create a better understanding of how health and non-health sectors, both public and private, all contribute to pandemic preparedness.--Publisher's description.
  • The book revisits the causes of persisting undernutrition in India, but moves away from the usual focus on women and children to a broader view of the entire population. It estimates the economic losses resulting from ignoring undernutrition in the adult working population, and questions the current narrow focus of nutrition interventions, suggesting that a family-based approach may provide quicker results and long-term sustainability. It compares the best and worst performing states in the country to glean learnings from both successes and failures and emphasizes the need to hand over the ownership of nutrition outcomes from the state to the community and family for more sustainable results. The book is organized in three sections: Part 1 details the nutrition status of the population, regional variations in nutrition outcomes, and government response in terms of interventions. Part 2 reviews issues and concerns like gender discrimination, poor child nutrition status, ineffective implementation of government programmes in the field, and the possible impacts of emerging issues like climate change. Part 3 seeks solutions from both international and country experiences.
  • A. Introduction -- B. Passive or active pharmacovigilance? -- C. Spontaneous reporting -- D. Cohort event monitoring -- E. Data processing -- F. Special types of event -- G. Relationship/causality assessment -- H. Signal identification -- I. Strengthening the signal -- J. Identifying risk factors -- K. Analyses -- L. Differences between spontaneous reporting and cohort event monitoring -- M. Organization -- N. Communication -- Annex.
  • Background -- Scope, goal, objectives and target audience -- Global burden of NCDs -- Role of research in the implementation of the Global Strategy Action Plan -- Need for a prioritized research agenda for prevention and control of major NCDs to improve public health -- Achievable outcomes through a prioritized research agenda for prevention and control of major NCDs -- Process for the development of the WHO NCD research agenda. Initial phase of development of the WHO NCD research agenda -- Ranking process -- Finalization of WHO NCD research agenda -- Key domains for research. Major NCDs. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) -- Cancer -- Chronic respiratory diseases -- diabetes -- NCD risk factors. Tobacco control -- Nutrition, physical activity and obesity -- Cross-cutting domains. Primary health care approach for prevention and control of NCDs -- Social determinants and NCDs -- Genetics -- Promoting use of research findings to policies and practice for prevention and control of noncommunicable diseases -- Top 20 priority areas for NCD research -- Key elements required for strengthening the research capacity of low- and middle-income countries for implementation of the WHO NCD research agenda.Contents of the compact disc: -- 1. Working papers -- 2. Reports of Meetings to develop the Prioritized NCD research agenda (2008-2010) -- 3. Lists of participants -- 4. List of other contributors and institutions that participated in the process of development and review of the prioritized NCD research agenda.
  • The WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme for Water Supply and Sanitation (JMP) reports every two years on progress towards the drinking-water and sanitation target under Millennium Development Goal 7. This target calls for halving the proportion of the population without sustainable access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation between 1990 and 2015. Estimates presented in its 2012 update report describe the situation at the end 2010 and supersede those of the JMP update published in March 2010. The report brings welcome news: measured by the proxy-indicator consistently used by the JMP since 2000, the MDG drinking-water target was met in 2010, five years ahead of schedule. However, the job is far from done. An estimated 780 million still lacked safe drinking water in 2010, and the world is unlikely to meet the MDG sanitation target. A reduction in urban-rural disparities and inequities associated with poverty; drinking-water coverage in countries in sub-Saharan Africa and Oceania; putting sanitation 'on track'; and universal coverage beyond 2015 all remain high on the development and public health agenda.--Publisher description.
  • "Even though progress towards the MDG target represents important gains in access for billions of people around the world, it has been uneven. Sharp geographic, sociocultural and economic inequalities in access persist and sometimes have increased. This report presents examples of unequal progress among marginalized and vulnerable groups. Section 1 presents the status of and trends in access to improved drinking water sources and sanitation. Section 2 provides a snapshot of inequalities in access to improved drinking water sources and sanitation. Section 3 presents efforts to strengthen monitoring of access to safe drinking water and sanitation services under a post-2015 development agenda, as well as the challenges associated with these efforts."--Publisher's website.
  • Chapter 1. Understanding PFA -- Chapter 2. How to help responsibly -- Chapter 3. Providing PFA -- Chapter 4. Caring for yourself & your colleagues -- Chapter 5. Practise what you have learned.

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