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Medical Informatics

  • Inverted perspectives: triggering change / Tom Munnecke and Robert M. Kolodner -- A window of opportunity / Robert M. Kolodner -- HealthePeople: person-centered, outcomes-driven, virtual health systems / Gary A. Christopherson -- The value of electronic health records / Blackford Middleton -- Personal outcomes in health care / Thomas L. Garthwaite -- Human factors: changing systems, changing behaviors / Marion J. Ball and Judith V. Douglas -- Laying the foundations: information architecture for HealthePeople / James E. Demetriades -- Critical areas of standardization / Jeffrey S. Blair and Simon Cohn -- The role of terminology in future health information systems / Steven H. Brown, Michael J. Lincoln, and Peter L. Elkin --Modeling for health care / Kenneth S. Rubin, Thomas Beale, and Bernd Blobel -- HealthePeople security architecture / Bernd Blobel and John M. Davis -- Open source health systems / Dipak Katra and David Forslund -- Critical standards convergence / Steven Wagner and J. Michael Fitzmaurice -- A European perspective on the cultural and political context for deploying the electronic health record / Angelo Rossi Mori and Gerard Freriks -- Convergence toward the Pan-Canadian electronic health record / Julie Richards, Shari Dworkin, and Nancy Gill -- HealthConnect: a health information network for all Australians / David Rowlands -- The Veterans Health Administration: quality, value, accountability, and information as transforming strategies / Jonathan B. Perlin and Robert M. Kolodner.
  • Overview of healthcare, disease, and disability / Jeffrey Kaye, Tracy Zitzelberger -- Computer science tools and techniques / Martha E. Pollack, Bart Peintner -- Pervasive computing in hospitals / Jakob E. Bardram, Heribert Baldus, Jesus Favela -- Pervasive computing in the home and community / Donald J. Patterson, Henry A. Kautz, Dieter Fox, Lin Liao -- Mobile and personal health and wellness management systems / Elina Mattila, Ilkka Korhonen, Niilo Saranummi --Sensors and wearable technologies for pervasive healthcare / Sungmee Park, Sundaresan Jayaraman -- Assistive technologies / Edmund LoPresti -- Human factors and usability of healthcare systems / Andre Kushniruk, Elizabeth Borycki -- Routes and requirements for realizing pervasive medical devices / Michael P. Craven -- User evaluation in pervasive healthcare / Tim Adlam, Roger Orpwood, Teresa Dunn -- The business of pervasive healthcare / Dadong Wan, Luis E. Taveras.
  • Practical data mining 2012, CRCnetBASE
    What is data mining and what can it do? -- The data mining process -- Problem definition (Step 1) -- Data evaluation (Step 2) -- Feature extraction and enhancement (Step 3) -- Prototyping plan and model development (Step 4) -- Model evaluation (Step 5) -- Implementation (Step 6) -- Supervised learning Genre section 1 - Detecting and characterizing known patterns -- Forensic analysis Genre Section 2 -Detecting, characterizing, and exploiting hidden patterns -- Genre Section 3 - Knowledge : Its acquisition, representation, and use.
  • Ways we see, learn, and practice medicine today : paradigms of what we are doing -- How physicians and other health professionals really (or should) think -- Reasoning in step-by-step clinical work and care : risk, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis -- Clinical and community medicine decision making -- How physicians communicate with themselves, their patients, and others : clinical communication and its vehicles -- Conclusions (with a short recapitulation) : welcome to the world of reasoned and evidence-based medicine.
  • The health information revolution -- Why interoperability is hard -- Models -- UML and XML -- Standards development organizations -- HL7 version 2 -- The HL7 V3 RIM -- Constrained information models -- Clinical document architecture -- HL7 dynamic model and IHE XDS -- Clinical terminology -- SNOMED CT -- Using SNOMED and HL7 together.
  • Part 1.Principles of Health Interoperability --The Health Information Revolution --Why Interoperability is Hard --Models --UML and XML --Privacy --Standards Development Organizations --Part 2.HL7 and Interchange Formats --HL7 Version 2 --The HL7 V3 RIM --Constrained Information Models --Clinical Document Architecture --HL7 Dynamic Model --IHE XDS --Part 3.SNOMED and Terminology --Clinical Terminology --Coding and Classification Schemes --SNOMED CT --SNOMED CT Concept Model --Using SNOMED and HL7 Together.
  • A leisurely look at statistical inference / Dirk Husmeier -- Introduction to learning Bayesian networks from data / Dir Husmeier -- A casual view of multi-layer perceptrons as probability models / Richard Dybowski -- Introduction to statistical phylogenetics / Dirk Husmeier -- Detecting recombination in DNA sequence alignments / Dirk Husmeier, Frank Wright -- RNA-based phylogenetic methods / Magnus Rattray, Paul G. Higgs -- Statistical methods in microarray gene expression data analysis / Claus-Dieter Mayer, Chris A. Glasbey -- Inferring genetic regulatory networks from microarray experiments with Bayesian networks / Dirk Husmeier -- Modeling genetic regulatory networks using gene expression profiling and state-space models / Claudia Rangel ... [et al.] --An anthology of probabilistic models for medical informatics / Richard Dybowski, Stephen Roberts -- Bayesian analysis of population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models / David J. Lunn -- Assessing the effectiveness of Bayesian feature selection / Ian T. Nabney ... [et al.] -- Bayes consistent classification of EEG data by approximate marginalization / Peter Sykacek, Iead Rezek, and Stephen Roberts -- Ensemble hidden Markov models with extended observation densities for biosignal analysis / Iead Rezek, Stephen Roberts -- A probabilistic network for fusion of data and knowledge in clinical microbiology / Steen Andreassen ... [et al.] -- Software for probability models in medical informatics / Richard Dybowski.
  • Introduction -- Adaptation and contraction theory for the synchronization of complex neural networks -- Temporal coding is not only about cooperation, it is also about competition -- Using non-oscillatory dynamics to disambiguate pattern mixtures -- Functional constraints on network topology via generalized sparse -- Evolution of time in neural networks, from the present to the past, and forward to the future -- Synchronization of coupled pulse-type hardware neuron models for CPG model -- A univesal abstract-time platform for real-time neural networks -- Solving complex control tasks via simple rule(s), using chaotic dynamics in a recurrent neural network model -- Time scale analysis of neuronal ensemble data used to feed neural network models -- Simultaneous EEG-fMRI, integrating spatial and temporal resolution -- Erratum to: Time scale analysis of neuronal ensemble data used to feed neural network models.
  • Pharmaceutical companies, academic researchers, and government agencies such as the Food and Drug Administration and the National Institutes of Health all possess large quantities of clinical research data. If these data were shared more widely within and across sectors, the resulting research advances derived from data pooling and analysis could improve public health, enhance patient safety, and spur drug development. Data sharing can also increase public trust in clinical trials and conclusions derived from them by lending transparency to the clinical research process. Much of this information, however, is never shared. Retention of clinical research data by investigators and within organizations may represent lost opportunities in biomedical research. Despite the potential benefits that could be accrued from pooling and analysis of shared data, barriers to data sharing faced by researchers in industry include concerns about data mining, erroneous secondary analyses of data, and unwarranted litigation, as well as a desire to protect confidential commercial information. Academic partners face significant cultural barriers to sharing data and participating in longer term collaborative efforts that stem from a desire to protect intellectual autonomy and a career advancement system built on priority of publication and citation requirements. Some barriers, like the need to protect patient privacy, present challenges for both sectors. Looking ahead, there are also a number of technical challenges to be faced in analyzing potentially large and heterogeneous datasets. This public workshop focused on strategies to facilitate sharing of clinical research data in order to advance scientific knowledge and public health. While the workshop focused on sharing of data from preplanned interventional studies of human subjects, models and projects involving sharing of other clinical data types were considered to the extent that they provided lessons learned and best practices. The workshop objectives were to examine the benefits of sharing of clinical research data from all sectors and among these sectors, including, for example: benefits to the research and development enterprise and benefits to the analysis of safety and efficacy. Sharing Clinical Research Data: Workshop Summary identifies barriers and challenges to sharing clinical research data, explores strategies to address these barriers and challenges, including identifying priority actions and "low-hanging fruit" opportunities, and discusses strategies for using these potentially large datasets to facilitate scientific and public health advances.
  • Designs and strategies for genomic mapping and haplotyping -- Genetic haplotyping in natural populations -- Genetic haplotyping in experimental crosses -- A general genetic model for genetic haplotyping -- Basic principle of functional mapping -- Functional mapping of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics -- Haplotyping drug response with a pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics link model -- Functional mapping of biological clocks -- Genetic mapping of allometric scaling -- Functional mapping of drug response with allometric scaling -- Joint functional mapping of drug efficacy and toxicity -- Modeling epistatic interactions in drug response -- Mapping genotype-environment interactions in drug response -- Nonparametric functional mapping of drug response -- Semiparametric functional mapping of drug response.
  • Pt. 1. System : tele-healthcare monitoring networks -- pt. 2. Hardware : medical sensors and devices -- pt. 3. Software : medical signal processing -- pt. 4. Others : medical security and privacy.
  • Telerehabilitation 2013, Springer
    Telerehabilitation, as a subset of telehealth, is the use of telecommunications to deliver rehabilitation services at a distance and can bridge the gaps created by personnel shortages that exist in underserved and remote areas, as well as serve persons in urban settings who cannot easily leave their homes or offices to seek care. Given the mobile nature of our society, telerehabilitation can enable continuity of care while persons travel for work, vacation and/or education. While the technical capacities to conduct telerehabilitation have surged ahead in the past 10 years, there has been slower, yet ongoing progress in the development of the policies (e.g., legislation; state licensure; reimbursement) that will be required to actualize widespread telepractice service delivery. Telerehabilitation presents a wide-angle view of telerehabilitation worldwide at a seminal time in its development. The book contains contributions from authors across multiple disciplines, as well as a consumer-based perspective. This book contributes significantly to the current understanding of telerehabilitation, as well as elucidating the immense potential for telerehabilitation-based service delivery to benefit persons with disabilities.
  • Introduction /Peter L. Elkin and Mark Samuel Tuttle --History of Terminology and Terminological Logics /Peter L. Elkin and Mark Samuel Tuttle --Knowledge Representation and the Logical Basis of Ontology /Peter L. Elkin and Steven H. Brown --Theoretical Foundations of Terminology /Peter L. Elkin --Compositionality: An Implementation Guide /Peter L. Elkin and Steven H. Brown --Interface Terminologies /S. Trent Rosenbloom --Springer Terminology Related Standards Development /Peter L. Elkin --Implementations of Terminology /Peter L. Elkin, Mark Samuel Tuttle, Marjorie Rallins, Jennifer Trajkovski and Elizabeth Lumakovska, et al. --Terminological Systems /Peter L. Elkin and Mark Samuel Tuttle --Conclusion /Peter L. Elkin and Mark Samuel Tuttle.
  • Back breaking work: implementing a spine registry in an orthopedic clinic / Brian C. Crolet -- A RHIO struggling to form: will it get off the ground? / Paul Zlotnik, Denny Lee, Mike Minear, and Prashila Dullabh -- A rough ride at the Theodore Roosevelt Cancer Center / Karen Albert, Nitika Gupta, Teresa Mason, Purvi Mehta -- Implementation of an electronic prescription writer in ambulatory care / Minhui Xie and Keven B. Johnson -- Online health care: a classic clash of technology, people and processes / John Butler, Dan Dalan, Brian McCourt, John Norris, and Randall Stewart -- A dungeon of dangerous practices / Andrew Amata, Allen Flynn, Michelle Morgan, Teresa Smith, and Mary Tengdin -- Different sides of the story / Allison B. McCoy -- Barcode medication administration implementation in the FIAT Health System / Linda Chan, William Greeley, Don Klingen, Brian Machado, Michael Padula, John Sum, and Angela Vacca -- H.I.T. or Miss / James McCormack, Bimal R. Desai, Jennifer Garvin, Randal Hamric, Kirk Lalwani, Andi Lushag, Alexey Panchenko, Deborah Quitmeyer, and JoAnna M. Vanderhoef -- The implementation of secure messaging / Zhou Yan -- Who moved my clinic? Donnelly University Pediatric Rehabilitation : the wheelchair clinic / Fredrick Hilliard -- OncoOrders: The early years / Chris Raggio and Judith W. Dexheimer -- Implementing a computerized triage system in the emergency department / Scott R. Levin, Daniel J. France, and Dominik Aronsky -- Medication barcode scanning: Code "Moo": dead COW / Laurie L. Novak and Kathy S. Moss -- Project NEED: new efficiency in an emergency department / Barry Little, Denise Johnson, Jennifer Tingle, Mary Stanfill, and Michael Roy. -- Digital radiology divide at McKinly / Neal Goldstein, David Ross, Ken Christensen, Jayashree Kalpathy-Cramer, Aseem Kumar, and Marilyn Schroeder.
  • Recent research in health decision making has shown that many patients, even those with a college education, have difficulties grasping a host of numerical concepts, including percentages and probabilities. Yet, basic numeracy and graph literacy are essential for understanding information relevant to making decisions about health, such as the incidence and prevalence of different diseases, risk reductions from medical screenings and treatments, and risk increases from side effects of treatments and unhealthy behaviors. Patients who have problems understanding such numerical concepts are often prone to errors in risk perception and medical choices. Importantly, informed medical decision making, heavily reinforced these days by the legal requirement for informed consent, depends critically on communication of quantitative medical information. Meeting the challenge of effectively communicating medical information to patients with different levels of numeracy and graph literacy has become more important than ever. Transparent Communication of Health Risks describes a series of cross-cultural studies investigating how people in countries with different medical and educational systems understand numerical and graphical information, what they know about existing medical treatments and screenings, which presentation formats help them better understand the relevant information, and how they use the data to make medical decisions. Focusing on the careful measurement of necessary knowledge and skills, the book also includes validated numeracy and graph literacy scales in English, Spanish, and German. Some of the topics covered in the book are:numeracy and graph literacy for health;measuring risk comprehension in educated samples;communicating information about medical treatment and screening;reducing the effect of framed messages about health;the effect of individual differences on shared decision making; andtransparent health information in the media.Transparent Communication of Health Risks emphasizes the importance and value of working toward the development of tailored risk communication interventions and clarifies the tasks ahead for health psychologists, public health professionals, pharmaceutical and medical education companies, medical physicists, and nurses.

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There are 120 high level MeSH Subject Headings under which all MeSH terms fall. Choose a subject heading to see the journals Lane offers in that subject area.

 

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Edited by Thomas A. Fleisher, Anthony J. Frew, Robert R. Rich, Harry W. Schroeder, Jr., William T. Shearer, Cornelia M. Weyand

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